An Inspirational Moment

Hello!  As you’ve probably noticed, I took a little break from blogging for a few months.  I think I’m back now.  I’ve had a bit of writers block, and I think that one good way to get past it is to have a guest blogger write for me Smile.

At B’nei Mitzvah services at Temple Beth Torah, students deliver a creative prayer.  The Rabbi and I do not see or edit these before the Bar or Bat Mitzvah because we don’t believe that we have a right to edit people’s prayers.   These prayers are often both beautiful and inspirational.  A little while back, a student delivered one that I thought my blog audience would particularly enjoy.  I asked her permission to share it with all of you.  She said yes, but only on condition of anonymity.  So, I can’t tell you who wrote this beautiful piece, but I hope that you will enjoy it as much as I did.

Photo Credit: Fotolia via microsoft.com

Creative Prayer

I pray that everyone can have a special connection with God, no matter what your religion. Say you were born into an atheist family and you were raised not to believe in God. This does not mean that you cannot change your view on whether God exists, and if He does what is He like? Is He mean or kind? Is He fair or unfair? Is He even a He? I strongly believe that you can choose for yourself. However, this is usually not the case. Most people are born into a religion that drills into your head that God exists, resulting in blind support for a significant portion of your life. Then, as you experience more trials and become wiser, you might begin to question God’s existence. The idea of some mysterious person you cannot see hear or touch controlling you and the people around you could be hard to accept. You might also ask yourself a commonly asked question: If God exists and is generous and fair, then why are there so many misfortunes in life like hunger, homelessness, sickness, and life changing events like the Holocaust? As a believer in God, I argue that God must show us the worst, in order for us to recognize the best.

I might also add that I personally went through this journey, questioning what I was taught to believe by my parents and in Hebrew school. But after going through some experiences and figuring out my views on God and Judaism, I can proudly say that I believe in God. The way I see it, God works through the people He created. What I mean by that is say you are nervous for a test coming up in school. You do not know if you will do well, even though you studied extra hard because you know this is not your best subject. Then, a friend observes your worries and says, “I know you will do well on the test because you studied a lot, you are a great student, and I have faith in you.” I believe that God was showing Himself through that friend’s words, so that pep talk was really from God. This has definitely happened to me before, and sometimes I wonder if God ever sent a message to someone through me. Because of these beliefs, I have a strong connection with God and I pray that everyone can experience what I did with Him.

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3 responses to this post.

  1. That’s really lovely! Please share with the student that it is an impressive and mature prayer and I hope she/he has the opportunity to share this strength in character and open nature time and time again. Yasher koach!

    Reply

  2. Posted by Marsha Ventura on December 9, 2011 at 7:15 am

    Thanks for posting this, it is wonderful.

    Reply

  3. Posted by beth levine on December 11, 2011 at 7:16 pm

    SO glad you are back, even if it is with a guest writer. I was completely inspired by your young prayer writer. I was also reminded of when I was her age, going through the same things (preparing for my Bat Mitzvah, living through the trials of the times – the early 1970s). I too was a G-d wrestler. I still am. It is in my nature. I love how she has decided that G-d speaks to her through people. It is a message that many people much older than she don’t get. She is wise beyond her years.

    Reply

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